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American Eskimo Dogs |Facts||Feature||History|

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

American Eskimo Dogs |Facts||Feature||History|


The American Eskimo Dog is small to medium in size and looks like a miniature Samoyed. The ears are triangular in shape, and the eye rims, nose and lips are black. The white, straight double coat may or may not have cream markings.

The hair on the outer coat stands out and away from the body, and the tail is plumed and curls over the back. The coat is heavier around the neck and may give an appearance of being a mane, and this feature is more pronounced in males.
The American Eskimo Dog descended from European spitz dogs and is related to the German spitz, keeshond, pomeranian and Italian spitz. Small white dogs were usually found in communities of German immigrants in the 19th century. The dogs likely immigrated with their guardians and became collectively known as the American spitz.

In later decades the dogs were used in traveling circuses as part of an act in which they displayed tricks. They were fast, intelligent, agile and easy to train.

The name was changed from American spitz to American Eskimo Dog in the early 1900s. One theory behind the change is that a kennel registered with the United Kennel Club — named the American Eskimo — was attributed to the small white spitz dogs that kennel owners Mr. and Mrs. F.M. Hall registered.

The National American Eskimo Dog Association was formed in 1969. The American Eskimo Dog Club of America was formed in 1985. The American Kennel Club added the breed in 1994, and in 1995 it added full recognition and the Non-Sporting group designation.
This breed is intelligent and easy to train. These dogs excel at obedience and enjoy having a job to do. They are also alert, friendly, loving, devoted, affectionate and playful. They are eager to please and make excellent guards and watchdogs.
American Eskimo Dogs are good with children and other dogs when introduced properly. They can be wary of strangers but usually welcome them after an introduction. They must be exercised and trained consistently to avoid negative behaviors such as separation anxiety, excessive barking, aggressiveness and over-guarding.
American Eskimo Dogs |Facts||Feature||History| American Eskimo Dogs |Facts||Feature||History| Reviewed by Stuck Up on Tuesday, July 31, 2018 Rating: 5

American English Coonhound |Facts|Feature|History|

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

American English Coonhound |Facts|Feature|History|



A descendant of the English Foxhound, the American English Coonhound is known for his speed and endurance. This athletic hound, which is capable of hunting raccoon and fox all night long, needs regular exercise to stay in condition. The American English Coonhound is sociable with humans and other dogs. The breed’s hard, protective coat needs little grooming.
The American English Coonhound is a true American dog, having sprung from the English Foxhound.  Early immigrants in the 17th and 18th centuries brought the ancestor of this bloodline to the American south, aptly named the Virginia Coonhound.  First President of the United States, George Washington, was one of the early breeders of these dogs, which were excellent hunters in their own right but were faced with obstacles unique to the Americas. Game in the American south utilized the trees, which prevented the Virginia Coonhound from tracking once the animal took to the trees.  Noting this difficulty, early breeders selected the Bloodhound, whose nose is considered the most powerful of all canines, for crossbreeding.  The resulting hound was the American English Coonhound, a high-endurance, sleek-bodied hound with cold nose tracking capable of tracking game in trees across rough terrain. The American English Coonhound once covered other similar looking breeds, such as the Bluetick Coonhound and the Redbone Coonhound but all three coonhounds have since been distinguished as their separate breeds.  The American English Coonhound was first acknowledged by the United Kennel Club in 1905 as the Coonhound and English Foxhound. Despite a long history in the United States, the American English Coonhound did not gain American Kennel Club recognition until 1995 when the Foundation Stock Service of the AKC recognized the breed as the American English Coonhound.  However, not until 2011 did the AKC recognize the breed in its own right.  The American English Coonhound started competing in the hound group in 2012 as the AKC's 171st breed.
The American English Coonhound is well known for its speed and endurance.  The breed has a deep chest, strong back, and well-defined muscles, giving it a graceful, athletic appearance.  The breed's head is of moderate size with kind, expressive eyes and long floppy ears that sit low on the skull.  When extended forward, the tip of the ears touches the tip of the nose.  The muzzle is square-shaped and proportionate to the head.  In fact, there is no disproportionate feature on the American English Coonhound whose well-balanced body is made for speed. The forelegs are angular and strong, and support uninhibited movement.  The hind legs are powerful and straight with well-defined thighs.  The American English comes in several color combinations including red and white ticked, blue and white ticked, tri-color with ticking, red and white, and white and black.  Ticking is a hallmark aesthetic feature of the breed whose coat is hard and protective and of medium length.
The American English Coonhound is a wonderfully social, mellow dog; especially after his daily run.  The breed is particularly disposed for the pack mentality and does very well with other dogs and children, though small dogs and cats may be mistaken for prey.  This breed does extremely well with strangers and would not make a very good guard dog as he's more likely to follow a stranger around than bark at him. American English Coonhounds are known as the some of the biggest barkers and howlers among the canines and will intensely bay and howl.  However, they tend to be quiet and calm indoors.  This breed is highly trainable but tends to be prey driven.  Once the scent is picked up, you may have a difficult time breaking your American English Coonhound's one track mind. Extra training and socialization are required to produce an obedient and mellow American English Coonhound, but with care and attention, this breed is among the sweetest for an active, outdoor family


American English Coonhound |Facts|Feature|History| American English Coonhound |Facts|Feature|History| Reviewed by Stuck Up on Tuesday, July 31, 2018 Rating: 5

Alaskan Malamute |Facts||Lifespan|Feature|

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Alaskan Malamute |Facts||Lifespan|Feature|


An immensely strong, heavy-duty worker of spitz type, the Alaskan Malamute is an affectionate, loyal, and playful but dignified dog recognizable by his well-furred plumed tail carried over the back, erect ears, and substantial bone.
Lifespan 10-14 years
The rugged Alaskan Malamute is a working dog, best suited to people who love the great outdoors. He plays vigorously and is most content when pulling or packing a load (sledding, ski-joring, weight pulling, backpacking), especially in cold weather. This breed should not be kept in a hot climate.

Alaskan Malamutes are very challenging to train and live with. Without sufficient exercise and challenging things to do, Malamutes become rambunctious and bored, which they usually express by chronic howling and destructive chewing. Bored Alaskan Malamutes are famous for chewing through drywall, ripping the stuffing out of sofas, and turning your yard into a moonscape of giant craters.

Potential aggression toward other animals is a real concern. When this breed fights, the battles can be serious and bloody. The Alaskan Malamute can be so dominant toward other dogs of the same sex that two males or two females should not be kept together unless you are a very experienced owner.

Malamutes can be predatory with smaller pets. I would not keep a Malamute with a cat unless the pair has grown up together.

When outdoors, Malamutes must be securely confined behind a high fence, for they can be escape artists with strong exploratory instincts. Once loose, they won't come back when you call them and they may run deer and molest livestock.

On the other hand, Alaskan Malamutes are usually great with people. From their wolfish appearance, they may look like intimidating protectors, but most Mals are friendly with everyone and make miserable watchdogs.

Still, this is a substantial, powerful breed, so it is essential to socialize youngsters so they grow up to trust and respect people.

This self-reliant breed will test for position in the family pecking order. Unless you establish yourself as the alpha (number one), he can be headstrong and demanding. Unneutered males, especially, can be very dominant and possessive of their food.

Alaskan Malamute |Facts||Lifespan|Feature|

Alaskan Malamute |Facts||Lifespan|Feature| Alaskan Malamute |Facts||Lifespan|Feature| Reviewed by Stuck Up on Tuesday, July 31, 2018 Rating: 5

Alaskan klee kai |Lifespan||Facts||Feature|

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Alaskan klee kai |Lifespan||Facts||Feature|


The Alaskan klee kai (pronounced KLEE-ki) means "small dog" in an Eskimo dialect. This breed is a recent one, developed in the early 1970s by Linda Spurlin in Wasilla, Alaska. She discovered an undersized Alaskan husky and fell in love with it, deciding it would be the ideal companion. Starting with this dog, Spurlin bred Alaskan huskies and Siberian huskies to create the klee kai, perhaps adding a schipperke and American Eskimo to obtain a smaller size.

In 1997, the United Kennel Club recognized the Alaskan klee kai. Even with this registration, the Alaskan klee kai is a rare breed with only 700 dogs.
The klee kai comes in three sizes: standard, over 15 inches up to and including 17 inches; miniature, over 13 inches up to and including 15 inches; and toy, up to 13 inches. They generally weigh between 10 and 20 pounds (four to nine kilograms), depending on size. The klee kai is assessed at eight months old and spayed or neutered if the dog has any disqualifying faults.

Like all Huskies, the klee kai has a double coat. They come in a variety of colors including black and white, gray and white, wolf gray and white, red and white and all white. All white, if not an albino, is the only solid color allowed. The klee kai has a mask and symmetrical markings and the characteristic tail that curls over the back. Like its larger cousins, the klee kai sheds or "blows coat" twice a year.
The Alaskan klee kai is an intelligent, high-activity dog. However, they are not "hyper." Unlike other husky breeds, they are highly trainable and make good watchdogs. Also unlike their cousins, they are suspicious of strangers. They require their owner's attention and are most likely found at their owner's side. They "talk back" and howl, but are not excessive barkers. Occasionally, a klee kai will be people-shy. This temperament is considered undesirable and dogs with this temperament are neutered.

Klee kai need a moderate amount of exercise. Because of their intelligence, they can become escape artists. If unhappy, the klee kai can escape through fences. Klee kai have a sense of humor and may play tricks on their owner. They excel in the sport of dog agility.
Klee kai need a large amount of interaction with their owners. They tolerate other dogs well. They are hunters and should be raised together with cats, if their owner is planning on one. The owner should be careful around pet rodents, birds and reptiles, as their husky prey drive is strong. Because they are clever, no pocket pet will be safe from them.

Klee kai make excellent watchdogs, but their size precludes them from being guard dogs. They accept family members and strangers, if introduced by the owner. They are hardy dogs with winter coats, but should not be left outdoors. They need a minimal brushing and combing once a week. Like cats, they are fastidious and keep themselves clean.

Klee kai are ideal for owners who want a small, active dog that does not require a large yard and can be content with walks and games of fetch. klee kai do not do well left alone for long periods. Anyone who cannot tolerate dog hair and shedding should consider another breed. Klee kai are long-lived, with claims of 15 to 20 years not unusual.
Alaskan klee kai |Lifespan||Facts||Feature| Alaskan klee kai |Lifespan||Facts||Feature| Reviewed by Stuck Up on Tuesday, July 31, 2018 Rating: 5

Akita Dog |Lifespan| |Facts|

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Akita Dog |Lifespan| |Facts|




She's a protective and affectionate dog who needs a strong leader, daily exercise, and enjoys time spent hanging out with her family.

Akitas are large and powerful dogs that require a firm and consistent leader to give them the early training and socialization that they require. They are natural guard dogs who rarely bark without reason. Akitas prefer to be with their families—they do not do well when left outside alone. And due to their thick double coats, this breed does not thrive in the heat. Akitas are generally healthy, but can be prone to some diseases, like hypothyroidism and hip dysplasia. Akitas are a generally healthy breed with an average lifespan of 12-15 years.
The Akita is a medium sized domestic Dog breed, first bred in Japan in the 1600s. The Akita originates from the Akita Prefecture in the north-east of Japan, hence its name. The exact reason for their initial creation is still disagreed upon, as to whether or not they were first bred as hunting or as fighting Dogs. Despite this, many favour the theory that this large breed was bred to aid local people with the hunting of Deer and Wild Boar and to possibly protect them from large carnivores like Wolves and Bears, with the fighting of them becoming popular, before people began to fortunately lose interest in the sport. Today, they are mainly used to assist their owners when hunting and are also a popular foreign breed in western households.
Like many other domestic breeds, today the Akita can be found in a variety of colours and with a milder temperament than its ancestors. They are however, still bred as working and hunting Dogs in their native Japan, assisting their master in catching food, as well as being an increasingly popular choice of guard Dog in the west. There are few health problems however, that are associated with this breed including hyperthyroid, hip and knee problems, which are all common ailments of larger Dogs particularly. They generally live for between 9 and 15 years, and females can have anywhere from three to twelve puppies per litter.
In the 1930s, the Akita was so rare in Japan due to the increasing popularity of non-native breeds, that only the very rich could apparently afford one. They were declared as a "national treasure" in Japan in an attempt to conserve the country's native breeds, and having an Akita in a household is said to symbolise good health, good fortune and prosperity. Due to their long, thick coat, Akitas shed heavily twice a year, for about 2 weeks at a time, meaning that they must be brushed every day to prevent their fur from matting. Possibly due to their natural hunting nature, household Dogs are known to enjoy carrying objects in their mouths
Akita Dog |Lifespan| |Facts| Akita Dog |Lifespan| |Facts| Reviewed by Stuck Up on Tuesday, July 31, 2018 Rating: 5

Airedale Terrier Lifespan Facts

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Airedale Terrier Lifespan Facts


Airedale terrier, the largest of the terriers, probably descended from the otterhound and an extinct broken-haired dog, the black-and-tan Old English terrier. It is named for the Aire valley, or Airedale, in Yorkshire. Intelligent and courageous, powerful and affectionate, though reserved with strangers, it has been used as a wartime dispatch carrier, police dog, guard, and big-game hunter. It is nicknamed “king of the terriers.”

The Airedale stands about 23 inches (58 cm) and usually weighs from 40 to 50 pounds (18 to 23 kg). It has a boxy appearance, with a long, squared muzzle; in profile, the line of the forehead extends straight to the nose. Its coat is dense and wiry, with a black saddle and with tan legs, muzzle, and underparts.

His size, strength, and unflagging spirit have earned the Airedale Terrier the nickname “The King of Terriers.” The Airedale stands among the world’s most versatile dog breeds and has distinguished himself as hunter, athlete, and companion.
The Airedale Terrier is the largest of all terrier breeds. Males stand about 23 inches at the shoulder, females a little less. The dense, wiry coat is tan with black markings. Long, muscular legs give Airedales a regal lift in their bearing, and the long head—with its sporty beard and mustache, dark eyes, and neatly folded ears—conveys a keen intelligence. Airedales are the very picture of an alert and willing terrier—only bigger. And, like his smaller cousins in the terrier family, he can be bold, determined, and stubborn. Airedales are docile and patient with kids but won’t back down when protecting hearth and home. Thanks to their famous do-it-all attitude, Airedales excel in all kinds of sports and family activities.
Lifespan 12-14 years.
The Airedale Terrier should do well on a high-quality dog food, whether commercially manufactured or home-prepared with your veterinarian’s supervision and approval. Any diet should be appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior). Some dogs are prone to getting overweight, so watch your dog’s calorie consumption and weight level. Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times
Airedale Terrier Lifespan Facts Airedale Terrier Lifespan Facts Reviewed by Stuck Up on Tuesday, July 31, 2018 Rating: 5

Afghan Hound Dog Fact

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Afghan Hound Dog Fact 



This dog breed is so old, it’s hard to pinpoint exactly where it originated. Legend has it that the Afghan hound was the dog rescued on Noah’s Ark. More likely, the dogs came over into Afghanistan with Alexander the Great’s army. (There are rock carvings showing the distinct-looking dogs in caves in Afghanistan to support this theory.) Many experts point to the saluki as the ancestor of the Afghan hound due to their closeness in appearance; both have been referred to as the Persian greyhound.

These graceful dogs might look like they were bred for a life of luxury, but originally they were used to aid hunters in the deserts and mountains of Afghanistan. Once on the chase, the dogs cornered animals (such as leopards) and kept them at bay until their owners could catch up. These clever dogs are capable of hunting and thinking independently, which means they need very little direction out in the field.
The average Afghan hound can reach speeds of up to 40 mph. For comparison, that’s about as fast as a purebred racehorse. The fastest horse in the world can only reach 43.97 miles per hour.

The Afghan hound is not only quick, but also incredibly agile and able to turn on a dime. Their unusual hip placement—they are higher and wider apart compared to other breeds'—allows them to make quick turns and maneuver around the uneven terrain of the Afghani mountains.
Afghan hounds are a sturdy breed and generally don’t have many health concerns; on average, they live to the ripe old age of 14 years. That said, they have a very low threshold for pain and will whimper at even the slightest injury.

Afghan Hound Dog Fact 

Afghan Hound Dog Fact Afghan Hound Dog Fact Reviewed by Stuck Up on Tuesday, July 31, 2018 Rating: 5

Affenpinscher Dog Whats About ? |Lifespan|

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Affenpinscher Dog Whats About ? |Lifespan|




Affenpinschers are small dogs with playful and fearless personalities. They are also described as mischievous, intelligent, confident, inquisitive, loyal and affectionate.
These spunky dogs may be difficult to housebreak and need consistent training or will take on a leadership role. Note that Affenpinschers are small and prone to injury, so they’re not recommended for homes with small children.
Affenpinschers are very active indoors and do well without a yard. They are great for apartment living, but they should still have a daily walk.
The Affenpinscher’s roots trace back to Germany and France. The dog, nicknamed “little devil with a mustache” in France, was bred down in size and used to control rats in homes, mills and farms in the 17th century.
These dogs are some of the oldest toy breeds and were used to create the Brussels Griffon and Miniature Schnauzer. The AKC recognized the breed in 1936. An Affenpinscher won Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 2013.The Affenpinscher is good for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. These dogs are sensitive to temperature extremes. Overly warm living conditions are damaging to the coat.The Affenpinscher needs a daily walk. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. This dog will shed a negligible amount. Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with dog hair in their cars and homes.The Affenpinscher must be consistent and firm. It learns most commands fairly quickly, but may take some time to housebreak. Some variety in training is recommended to keep the Affenpinscher interested.

Affenpinscher Dog Whats About ? |Lifespan|
Affenpinscher Dog Whats About ? |Lifespan| Affenpinscher Dog Whats About ? |Lifespan| Reviewed by Stuck Up on Tuesday, July 31, 2018 Rating: 5

German Shepherd Dog |Fact||Lifespan|Whats Good|

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

German Shepherd Dog |Fact||Lifespan|Whats Good|


German Shepherd Dogs can stand as high as 26 inches at the shoulder and, when viewed in outline, presents a picture of smooth, graceful curves rather than angles. The natural gait is a free-and-easy trot, but German Shepherd Dogs can turn it up a notch or two and reach great speeds.

There are many reasons why German Shepherd Dogs stand in the front rank of canine royalty, but experts say their defining attribute is character: loyalty, courage, confidence, the ability to learn commands for many tasks, and the willingness to put their life on the line in defense of loved ones. German Shepherd Dogs will be gentle family pets and steadfast guardians, but, the breed standard says, there’s a “certain aloofness that does not lend itself to immediate and indiscriminate friendships.”

The AKC Standard says the German Shepherd "has a distinct personality marked by direct and fearless, but not hostile, expression, self-confidence, and a certain aloofness that does not lend itself to immediate and indiscriminate friendships. The dog must be approachable, quietly standing its ground and showing confidence and willingness to meet overtures without itself making them."

That's a great description of an ideal German Shepherd.

Unfortunately, it's very difficult to find an ideal German Shepherd today. Nowadays, this breed is all over the map in temperament. Lines that are bred for protection work and the sport of schutzhund tend to be "hard-tempered" and businesslike. Show lines range from mild and mellow, to hyperactive and skittish, to downright dumb and dopey. And many German Shepherds bred by backyard breeders have risky temperaments and suffer from a host of health problems.

Energy levels vary from vigorous to laid-back, but all German Shepherds, to maintain their athletic shape, need brisk walking every day and all-out running in a safe, enclosed area as often as possible.

Mental exercise (advanced obedience classes, agility classes, schutzhund, tracking, herding) is even more important for German Shepherds. This is a smart, thinking breed (at least the good ones are!) and his intelligence is often wasted in a home that simply wants a casual pet.

Finally, early and ongoing socialization is a must to develop a stable, confident temperament.

Most German Shepherds are fine with other family pets, if introduced when young. However, some individuals are cat chasers, and many individuals are dominant or even aggressive with strange dogs of the same sex.
 German Shepherd Lifespan 7-10 years.
One of the most capable and trainable breeds in all of dogdom, exceedingly eager to learn and work, an ideal German Shepherd, when well-trained by a confident owner, is a magnificent companion.

German Shepherds may be targeted for "banning" in certain areas, or refusal of homeowner insurance policies. In this day and age, the legal liabilities of owning any breed that looks intimidating and has a history as a guard dog should be considered. People are quicker to sue if such a dog does anything even remotely questionable.
  German Shepherd Dog |Fact||Lifespan|Whats Good|
German Shepherd Dog |Fact||Lifespan|Whats Good| German Shepherd Dog |Fact||Lifespan|Whats Good| Reviewed by Stuck Up on Tuesday, July 31, 2018 Rating: 5

Presa Canario|Facts||Bio|Lifespan|

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Presa Canario|Facts||Bio|Lifespan|



A mastiff breed from the Canary Islands, the Presa Canario has a commanding appearance and may even be a potentially dangerous guard dog if raised by an inexperienced owner. Find out everything you need to know about the breed and to handle him properly before making one part of your family.
The Presa Canario is affectionate and alert. But it’s no surprise that these large dogs from Spain need to keep active to stay happy.

The American Kennel Club (AKC) labels the Presa Canario — nicknamed “Presa,” “Canary dog” and simply “Perro canario” — as a Foundation Stock Service breed. This allows the breed the umbrella of the AKC’s security to continue to develop, but these dogs are not eligible for AKC registration.

The head is massive and compact, covered in loose skin and squarish. This breed has a pronounced furrow between the frontal lobes that is about two-thirds the width of the skull.

Believed to date back to the 15th or 16th century, the Presa Canario is a mastiff breed descended from the Canary Islands by Spanish conquistadores. They were used to guard farms, wrangle cattle and drive off or kill other stray or wild dogs.
In the 1970s the breed gained popularity again by people who were hoping to create a courageous and strong work dog.
The presa canario originated in Spain in Tenerife and Gran Canaria (Canary Islands).

It is believed to be the result of mating between the majorero, a dog indigenous to these islands, and other molossoids introduced to the Canary Islands. There are references to a similar type of dog from the 1500s.

In the book Perro de Presa Canario, author Manuel Curto Gracia examines this breed: “Since the days of conquest and colonization, the Canary prey dogs became important for the services they offered to inhabitants. The people used the dogs to immobilize cattle for the slaughter, to hunt wild dogs and, later, to guard and drive the cattle.”

Gracia adds that although there is no concrete proof of the Presa existing before the 1800s, the dogs back then in that region likely closely resembled the Presa Canario.
The Presa is confident, calm, devoted and vigilant. Obedient with family members, these dogs may act suspicious around strangers. Good, early socialization can help them adapt to new people and situations.

Presas make for excellent guard dogs — their large appearance alone is intimidating, and their hyperawareness makes them stand ready to defend people or property.
Presa Canario|Facts||Bio|Lifespan| Presa Canario|Facts||Bio|Lifespan| Reviewed by Stuck Up on Tuesday, July 31, 2018 Rating: 5

Bully Kutta |Facts||Bio||Lifespan|

Tuesday, July 31, 2018


The Bully Kutta is an extremely dog-aggressive mastiff. They are thick-boned with a muscular structure, a broad head, and the tail tapering to a fine point. Their eyes are almond-shaped and ears erect but are often cropped. Like the bulldogs, they have loose skin especially around the neck and the jaw. These dogs are predominantly white. However, combinations of other colors are also not uncommon.

Theories suggest that, during the British invasion, the British soldiers brought their mastiff dogs with them to India. These dogs later bred with the regional Indian mastiff breeds, giving birth to this new breed of bully kuttas.

During British rule, the Indian continent was divided into many princely states that were divided into many kingdoms, with each kingdom having their own preferences. Thus, the Bully Kutta survived in different features and forms according to the respective zonal preferences. Some of the most common variations are:


  • Ancient Type Bully Kutta
  • Nagi Bully Kutta
  • Mastiff Type Bully Kutta
  • Aseel Bully Kutta
  • Modern Bully Kutta


There is enough debate whether this dog, also known as the Pakistani Mastiff, is the same as the Indian Mastiff. There have also been extensive disputes about the country of origin of this breed, with some claiming it to be India, while the others Pakistan. There is also ambiguity whether this dog actually originated in Northern India or in the Thanjavur and Thiruchi districts in the South.

Whatever the fact is, this strong and dominant Bulldog mix finds its root back to the extinct breed Alaunt that originated in Sindh (desert area of Kutch), Rajasthan and Punjab (Bhawalpur) regions of modern-day Pakistan. In Pakistan, these dogs are extensively used as a guard and fighting dog even to the present day.
Due to their heavy size and dominance, bully kuttas can be dangerous to both the owners  as also the strangers, and are potentially not good with children and other pets (including dogs). They are aggressive by instinct.

The bullies are also not recommended for apartment life since they need a huge space. Hence, they are not recommended for first-time or timid owners. However, strong socialization is recommended to have a control of such situations.

Bully Kuttas have the gait similar to that of a lion or tiger. They are intelligent and noble. With their strong sense of sight and smell, they make a good guard dog that would not just protect its own territory but also the owner and his property. However, the puppy needs enough training to develop a bond with its owner. These dogs drool and are prone to sleeping all day.

Bully Kutta |Facts||Bio||Lifespan| Bully Kutta |Facts||Bio||Lifespan| Reviewed by Stuck Up on Tuesday, July 31, 2018 Rating: 5

Miniature Schnauzer |Fact||Bio|Lifespan|

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Miniature Schnauzer |Fact||Bio|Lifespan|



In Disney’s timeless, animated film Lady and the Tramp, Tramp was a Schnauzer, the dog about town who captures the pampered Cocker Spaniel’s heart and with whom Lady shares perhaps the most famous strand of spaghetti ever.

The Miniature Schnauzer is usually good with other family pets. Though he may chase the family cat for fun, he's seldom serious about it. However, he may be scrappy with strange dogs of the same sex.

Although he knows his own mind and often displays an obstinate resistance to walking on the leash, most Miniature Schnauzers respond well to obedience training. Many individuals win top awards in advanced obedience.

This breed is adaptable to different homes, and makes an excellent traveling companion.


Back in 1503, painter Albrecht Durer depicted a Schnauzer in his watercolor Madonna with the Many Animals. A representation of the Schnauzer also appears in a tapestry made in about 1501.

The Miniature Schnauzer is the smallest of the Schnauzer trio and was developed to excel as an all-around farm dog and rat catcher. The larger Standard and Giant Schnauzers were also used as drovers, to pull carts with produce from the farm to town and guard them.

Schnauzers have always been prized for their working ability. Even today, the Miniature Schnauzer clubs in Germany hold regular “ratting” trials to ensure that the breed retains his essential working characteristics and is not merely bred as a show dog.

Here in the U.S., Miniature Schnauzers can be seen competing in Barn Hunt and Earthdog trials, as well as in conformation, obedience, agility and rally.

The beard on the Schnauzer muzzle is much more than a fashion statement. In fact, schnauze means muzzle in German. Not many breeds are named for a physical feature. Combined with bushy eyebrows, the Schnauzer’s whiskers and facial hair stamp him with an unmistakable look.

The Miniature Schnauzer is believed to have developed from matings with the Affenpinscher. Minis have been bred in this country since 1925, and the breed parent club, the American Miniature Schnauzer Club, was established in August 1933.

The American Kennel Club has always classified the Miniature Schnauzer in the Terrier Group while European registries put the Mini in the Working Group alongside the two larger breeds, the Standard and Giant.
Miniature Schnauzer |Fact||Bio|Lifespan| Miniature Schnauzer |Fact||Bio|Lifespan| Reviewed by Stuck Up on Tuesday, July 31, 2018 Rating: 5

Bull Terrier Dog |History| |Facts| Lifespan|

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Bull Terrier Dog |History| |Facts| Lifespan|







The Bull Terrier is a playful, comical, and exuberant. But beware: this affectionate, sweet-natured, and devoted breed can be mischievous or even aggressive to small animals and other dogs. To avoid behavioral problems with the Bull Terrier, provide it mental and physical exercise daily.


They are stocky and muscular and come in two varieties: standard and miniature sizes. The standard version reaches about 22 inches in height and a maximum of about 60 pounds (27 kilograms). The miniature version is a maximum of about 14 inches high and weighs up to about 33 pounds (15 kilograms). The most distinctive physical feature of the Bull Terrier is its head, which is egg-shaped and flat on top. The eyes are small, dark, and close-set. The ears are pointy. The body is broad and the back short and strong. Bull Terriers have a medium-length tail.

The Bull Terrier's coat is short and dense and is white, black, brindle, red, fawn or tri-colored. The dogs are considered average shedders. They live about 10 to 12 years.

Bull terriers were developed in England during the 19th century. Around 1835, a cross between the old English terrier and the bulldog produced the Bull Terrier. Later crosses to the Spanish Pointer; even later, to the white English terrier and Dalmatian, produced a stylish, tough, white dog. In the mid 1800s, the white version of the breed, known as "white cavaliers," became a favorite pet among gentry. Crosses to the Staffordshire Bull Terrier reintroduced color around 1900.

Today, Bull Terriers are gentler than their ancestors but are still strong, fearless dogs. They are primarily family pets, but are not suitable for many families.
Bull Terrier Dog |History| |Facts| Lifespan| Bull Terrier Dog |History| |Facts| Lifespan| Reviewed by Stuck Up on Tuesday, July 31, 2018 Rating: 5
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