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Alaskan Malamute |Facts||Lifespan|Feature|

Alaskan Malamute |Facts||Lifespan|Feature|


An immensely strong, heavy-duty worker of spitz type, the Alaskan Malamute is an affectionate, loyal, and playful but dignified dog recognizable by his well-furred plumed tail carried over the back, erect ears, and substantial bone.
Lifespan 10-14 years
The rugged Alaskan Malamute is a working dog, best suited to people who love the great outdoors. He plays vigorously and is most content when pulling or packing a load (sledding, ski-joring, weight pulling, backpacking), especially in cold weather. This breed should not be kept in a hot climate.

Alaskan Malamutes are very challenging to train and live with. Without sufficient exercise and challenging things to do, Malamutes become rambunctious and bored, which they usually express by chronic howling and destructive chewing. Bored Alaskan Malamutes are famous for chewing through drywall, ripping the stuffing out of sofas, and turning your yard into a moonscape of giant craters.

Potential aggression toward other animals is a real concern. When this breed fights, the battles can be serious and bloody. The Alaskan Malamute can be so dominant toward other dogs of the same sex that two males or two females should not be kept together unless you are a very experienced owner.

Malamutes can be predatory with smaller pets. I would not keep a Malamute with a cat unless the pair has grown up together.

When outdoors, Malamutes must be securely confined behind a high fence, for they can be escape artists with strong exploratory instincts. Once loose, they won't come back when you call them and they may run deer and molest livestock.

On the other hand, Alaskan Malamutes are usually great with people. From their wolfish appearance, they may look like intimidating protectors, but most Mals are friendly with everyone and make miserable watchdogs.

Still, this is a substantial, powerful breed, so it is essential to socialize youngsters so they grow up to trust and respect people.

This self-reliant breed will test for position in the family pecking order. Unless you establish yourself as the alpha (number one), he can be headstrong and demanding. Unneutered males, especially, can be very dominant and possessive of their food.

Alaskan Malamute |Facts||Lifespan|Feature|

Alaskan Malamute |Facts||Lifespan|Feature| Alaskan Malamute |Facts||Lifespan|Feature| Reviewed by Stuck Up on Tuesday, July 31, 2018 Rating: 5

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